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By Beth Doane and Kelly Gibbons, Features Editors

Headshot 7.13As someone who has always cared about animals and the environment, actress, producer, and philanthropist, Kristin Davis, saw the need to take action when she witnessed the severity of these issues firsthand. “Once I started traveling I was even more driven to try to preserve the few truly wild areas left on the planet. The beauty you can see around the world is so diverse. I’ve been to Indonesia, many countries in Africa, and islands all over the world, that I felt the need to try to share the beauty and the threat to these special places with everyone. I learned that the natural world and the human world are inextricably linked. Through my work with Oxfam I discovered that in the areas that were being destroyed there was also a human cost to that destruction. Loss of jobs and human rights accompany natural destruction in most instances. Those thoughts took on a more specific form when I was part of a baby elephant orphan rescue in Kenya in 2009. I became a part of the work done by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, which protects habitats and raises orphans of all kinds to rerelease into the wild. What we need now is for everyone to become an activist, at least in terms of how they spend their money. What you buy represents who you are,” says Kristin. “A small amount of research can show the difference between companies that are making a positive difference in our world and those who are depleting resources- both human and natural.”

In Kristin’s latest project, the documentary, Gardeners of Eden, she takes us on a gripping journey, going behind the scenes of the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, as we witness their heroic efforts to stop the poachers in the bush, rescue the orphans of slain elephants, and raise them by hand until, one day, returning them to their home in the wild.

UNHCR High Profile Supporter Kristin Davis meets with the Nyumanzi Refugee Community Leaders. The number of South Sudanese refugees fleeing into Northern Uganda is 154000, since the 15th December 2013.

UNHCR High Profile Supporter Kristin Davis meets with the Nyumanzi Refugee Community Leaders. The number of South Sudanese refugees fleeing into Northern Uganda is 154000, since the 15th December 2013.